Week 14 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 12)

August 24, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

We have an interesting new treat for you this week: sweet potato greens. The sweet potato patch is a lush jungle and so we thought the plants could spare some foliage. Sweet potato greens are widely eaten in Africa and Asia and finally starting to gain popularity here in the good old USA. I remember growing sweet potatoes in the early 1990’s in my front yard in Portland and my Zimbabwean neighbors would stop and ask for the greens. At the time I thought they were crazy, but I’m finally starting to catch on.

You can use them like spinach. I lightly sautéed some with garlic and ate them with my eggs. The flavor is mild, rich, and very satisfying. One of the things that interest me about sweet potato greens is that they come from a plant family that we don’t normally eat, the morning glory family. They are also good for you. There is more info about sweet potatoes in the links below.

http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/sweet-potato-greens

http://www.epicurious.com/archive/blogs/editor/2012/08/cooking-with-sweet-potato-greens.html

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet corn
  • Green beans
  • Sweet peppers – the Gypsy peppers are starting to ripen!
  • Carrots
  • Rainbow chard
  • Zucchini/summer squash
  • White onions
  • Sweet potato greens – see note above
  • Melon
  • Hot peppers​- Hungarian Hot Wax and Serranos​

SMALL BOX:

  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet corn
  • Green beans
  • Sweet peppers
  • Carrots
  • Cucumbers
  • Sweet potato greens – see note above
  • White onion
  • Zucchini/summer squash

RECIPES
​See link above for recipes and information about cooking your sweet potato greens.

Grilled Summer Veggie Fajitas
http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/grilled-summer-veggie-fajitas

​Fried Tempura Style Green Beans with Sweet Hot Mustard
http://www.marthastewart.com/319495/fried-green-beans-with-sweet-hot-mustard#Green%20Bean%20Recipes|/275532/green-bean-recipes/@center/276955/seasonal-produce-recipe-guide|319495

Carrot Spice Pancakes
These pancakes are smaller versions of a carrot cake dessert, only you get to eat them for breakfast! To two cups of your favorite pancake batter, fold in the following ingredients:
3/4 cup grated carrots
1/2 cup applesauce
1/2 tsp. ground cardamom (good, but optional)
1 tsp. ground cinnamon.
1/2 tsp. ground ginger or 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
Cook batter on a hot skillet and serve with yogurt, maple syrup or your favorite fresh fruit, jam or jelly.


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we have Asian pears! These pears are from Rancho Del Paraiso located in Vacaville, Ca. This particular variety called Shinko is a short season variety that is harvested for only a few weeks. The Shinko Asian pear is crunchy and sweet. Some prefer to peel off the hardy skin, but if you want the extra nutrients and fiber, ​eat it skin and all.​ It is normal for Shinko pears to range in color​ from​​ green to orange as they are picked based on sugar content. Like most fruit, this variety will soften up if left unrefrigerated.

Also in your box you will find a mix of Valley Pearl green grapes and Sweet Scarlett red grapes from Ken’s Top Notch Produce in Reedley, Ca. Also from Ken’s we have some sweet September Snow white peaches.

​Creamy Grape Salad
http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/creamy-grape-salad

White Peach Tart
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/white-peach-tart

We hope you enjoy this week​’​s summer fruit!
~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The forecast is calling for much cooler temperatures in the next 3 weeks which will be nice for fieldwork but not sure my fall planting a will appreciate it. No matter what the flowers should keep flowing since I have a large late planting of dahlias, mums and zinnias in one of our big hoop houses.

Early this spring I ordered ten or so varieties of old fashioned mums from ‘kings mums’ and took cuttings from them. I planted them in the hoop house, netted them and they are looking so incredible. I’m hoping for a great crop.

As for this week were still in the midst of lots of dahlias, some new grasses, green celosia, zinnias and maybe some gladiolus.

Enjoy!
Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

​~​
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 13 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 11)

August 17, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

One of the privileges of my job is that every day I get to admire the beauty of the fields, the many colored growing plants and flowers. It is a pleasure that I often wish was easier to describe and share with you. One thing we have been working at for a couple of years now is taking at least a photo or two a week and putting them on Instagram. Thanks to Rachel and Maia for all the great photos. So please take the opportunity and follow us on Instagram or Facebook – the photos go there too. Angie also has incredible photos on her Little Boy Flowers website and Instagram account. 

broccoliThis morning I took a moment to check out the fall broccoli. If all goes well (standard farming disclaimer!) the first of the 3 plantings should be ready to harvest in late September or early October, right on target.

Thanks for your support,

John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK
Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Dill
  • Zucchini/summer squash
  • Potatoes
  • Basil
  • Garlic
  • Melon
  • Cucumbers
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Red onion

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Eggplant
  • Potatoes
  • Garlic
  • Melon
  • Carrots

RECIPES
​It’s a good week for ​salad-
– lettuce, shredded carrots​, tomatoes, thinly sliced celery… try making your own salad dressing, it’s so easy!

6 Salad Dressings​ To Know By Heart
http://www.thekitchn.com/5-salad-dressings-to-know-by-heart-essential-recipes-from-the-kitchn-192151

Patatas Bravas
http://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/patatas-bravas

Watermelon, Cantaloupe, or Honeydew Sorbet
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/kitchen-assistant/melon-recipes/melon-recipes_4


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week in our summer fruit CSA we have Sweet Scarlett red grapes from Ken’s Top Notch Produce, grown in Reedley, Ca. Also from Ken’s we have September Snow white peaches.Lastly, we have Honey Punch pluots from Qunico/Wild River Farms located in Marysville, Ca.​

Basil-Peach Chicken Breasts
http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/basil-peach-chicken-breasts

A Dozen Ways to Serve Stone Fruit
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/24/magazine/a-dozen-ways-to-serve-stone-fruit.html​

Enjoy,

​~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

All of my fall planted biennials have been seeded and are growing nicely in the greenhouse. From July- August I start planning and seeding my overwintered flowers for the next spring: Icelandic poppies, delphiniums, dianthus, campanula, larkspur, scabiosa, nigella, queen anne’s lace. It seems crazy to start these cool loving crops in the heat of the summer but usually they do just fine if I keep them in a cooler part of our propagation area. In another month or so they will be planted in the field so that they’ll have some time to establish a nice deep root system before the winter really sets in. Come spring, God willing, they will be lush, full plants ready to bloom like crazy. 

I’ve also been planning my bulb plantings that will go in in the next few months. This year I’ll be growing a lot more tulips, ranunculus, anemones, and hyacinths for the bulb share that I’m going to be offering next spring. This will be a shorter season CSA share that will go 8 weeks, starting with the first anemones of the season. My early spring flowers are some of my favorites and I’m excited to share them with our CSA members. I’ll keep you all posted when we work out the other details.

This week in your bouquets you’ll see more dahlias, asters, green syphlid celosia, rudbeckia (triloba and hirta), zinnias and lisianthus.

Enjoy!

Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

​~

Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 12 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 10)

August 10, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

This is week 12 of our 24-week summer season, so we are at the midpoint. There is so much good food coming in the second half of the season. Things to look forward to: red sweet peppers, more melons, corn, tomatoes, green beans, fall squashes, and of course all the fall greens.

This week the crew will be harvesting the bulk of the potato crop, which will then be stored in the cooler for the next few months. Here’s a video of Cory using the marvelous potato digger that saves us so much hard work. Although the digger leaves the potatoes on the soil surface, they still do need to be picked up, bagged, and moved to the barn, which is no small task. I figure there will be 20-25,000 lbs. of potatoes to pick up, from our ¾ acre potato patch. You should see potatoes in your boxes every other week or so from here on out. Last week’s red potatoes were called Colorado Rose. We also grew Desiree and Red Gold (Reds), Kenebec (our favorite white potato), Yukon Gold, and Purple Viking (purple skin with white flesh).

Enjoy,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK
Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Corn
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Melons
  • Green pepper
  • Hot peppers
  • Beets
  • Garlic
  • Onion
  • Cilantro
  • Edamame – Please see recipes below. This is a treat!

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Cucumbers
  • Tomatoes
  • Melons
  • Beets
  • Garlic
  • Cilantro
  • Edamame — Please see recipes below. This is a treat!

RECIPES
Just click on the “live” link address to open each article in a new browser window. You can also highlight the address and copy, then paste it into the “go-to” address bar of a new window. If you are unfamiliar with this process, please don’t hesitate to give me a call.

Five Ways to Eat Edamame
http://www.thekitchn.com/five-ways-to-eat-edamame-97688

Cilantro & Corn Salsa
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/almost-famous-corn-salsa-recipe.html


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we are featuring a late variety of a traditional apricot called Autumn Glow from Coco Ranch in Dixon. These are firm fleshy apricot that are rich in phyto-nutrients as a result of their long ripening period. Coco Ranch is a small, 40 acre family-owned and -operated farm. Owner Greg took me through his orchard Sunday morning where I tried countless varieties of apples and fig while he explained to me his agriculture practices. We also are featuring his Sommerfeld apples which are crisp, juicy, and delicious! This a Northern California heritage variety. At his farm, I learned that Greg has not had to fertilize these trees in 18 years. He allows his branch pruning’s to settle on the orchard floor and decompose along with other organic plant material. 

Along with apricots and apples, we also have some Bartlett Pears from Steamboat Acres in Sacramento, Ca. It may seem early but the majority of pear growers in California are experiencing early ripening due to weather and water shortages. This happens naturally when fruit trees experience these types of environmental factors. Luckily the pears are still delicious as always and farmers have access to an understanding market.

We hope you all enjoy this weeks bounty of California grown organic fruit! We work very hard to get to know our farmers and their agricultural practices so that you receive the highest quality fruit possible. If you ever have any questions, comments, or concerns please do not hesitate to ask!

~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The cooler days have been a relief for us humans and for the flowers as well. Though heat is good for certain crops like sunflowers and zinnias, once it’s over 90 degrees, many of the crops, like the dahlias, start to get stressed. I find that our dahlias always do the best in the later part of our season. I guess we’re almost there. Our main season plantings are gorgeous right now, full and bright. The lisianthus is doing awesome. It’s a difficult crop for me since it takes so long to mature from seed but when it does well, it really pays off. Thankfully, I got the netting on just in time to keep them from flopping over. Lots of flowers require netting in order to keep them upright- snapdragons, lisianthus, mums, godetia. Dahlias need support also since they get so heavy and tend to flop over, so I place t-posts around the outside of the beds and then run lines of twine on the outside of the bed to keep them hemmed in. 

This week on the farm, we’re planting sunflowers, weeding a bit and harvesting a whole bunch. We have big orders for the wholesaler this week and a wedding and a photo shoot later in the week. I’m working hard building my portfolio for my wedding and design business. After this season I should have a lot more fabulous images for my website. Yay!

In your bouquets this week you’ll be seeing more marigolds, dahlias, lisianthus, cosmos, and green syphlid celosia.

Enjoy!

Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

~Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 11 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 9)

August 5, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Yesterday evening, as my four year old son Jude and I engaged in some heavy duty porch sitting, out of the blue he asked “Papa, can we eat clouds?” As first I was merely charmed by the question. After a moment I realized that in a sense clouds are what we eat. Clouds become rain, and rainwater, along with Carbon Dioxide from the air, is the key ingredient of photosynthesis, which eventually produces all that we eat. All this dry dustiness is making me hungry; let’s have some of those clouds and rain!

One more Jude story: A few days ago, we were grilling veggies for dinner. Jude says “we’re going to have a feast — that’s because we live on a farm!” Indeed.  We are very, very lucky to be at the center of such abundance. Despite the sometimes discouraging trials of farming, the kids have a way of setting me straight.

Thanks for supporting the farm, I hope it feeds you well,

John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Corn
  • Chard
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla onions
  • Melon
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes
  • Arugula
  • Cucumbers
  • Potatoes! The first of the season.
  • Basil- one of our members wrote to share that he has great results storing his basil in a tupperware in the fridge. The attached picture is the basil from his box on July 23, still looking fresh!

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Corn
  • Chard
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla onions
  • Melon
  • Tomatoes
  • Arugula
  • Cucumbers

RECIPES

Just click on the “live” link address to open each article in a new browser window. You can also highlight the address and copy, then paste it into the “go-to” address bar of a new window. If you are unfamiliar with this process, please don’t hesitate to give me a call.

Swiss Chard Frittata with Tomato & Onions
Fritattas are a great summer food, delicious warm or river-side at room temperature:
http://capayvalleyfarmshop.com/blog/recipes/swiss-chard-and-tomato-frittata/

Moroccan-Style Pickled Carrots
Pickles are so cooling in the heat… try this with onions and cucumbers too:
http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/pickled-carrots-moroccan-style
This recipe refers to “baby” carrots, which are just highly processed mature carrots. Using the carrots in your CSA box this week, just cut them into spears and proceed.

Melon Agua Fresca
Also delicious garnished with a sprig of basil:
http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1012543-watermelon-or-cantaloupe-agua-fresca


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

To celebrate the beginning of August we will be showering you will some sweet, crisp pears! These Bartlett pears are from Steamboats Acres who are located along the Sacramento River. We also have Dapple Dandy pluots and the delicious Redhead nectarines from Ferrari Ranch in Linden, Ca. We hope you enjoy!

Pears for eating and pears for baking: When to use which type
http://localfoods.about.com/od/pears/qt/Types-Of-Pears.htm

Five ways to enjoy pluots
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/fast-fresh/five-ways-to-enjoy-pluots
Grill, glaze, brûlée, salsa, salad, yum!

~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

This weekend we had a little space to slow down and relax a bit. It was in this mode, that I took an evening walk through my patches of flowers and shrubs, gathering armloads of this and that for a special order. A few hydrangeas here, a tassel of branches, some crocosmia, a handful of dahlias. There’s something about the act of hunting and gathering beauty that makes me tick in a way that nothing else does. Blame it on my prehistoric ancestors perhaps. Sometimes I feel a little indulgent spending so much time and energy putting together such ephemeral beauty, but then again if I didn’t do it, someone else will. If we’re going to use flowers, we might as well use the best. I still feel like I have a long way to go in my journey as a flower farmer. Each year I hone my techniques a little bit more but I still feel like I have a lot to learn. I guess that’s one aspect to my work that keeps me coming back.

On the farm this week we are harvesting more dahlias- they’re finally starting to pick up the pace. These ephemeral beauties are not known for a long vase life so don’t be dismayed if they don’t last more than 3 or 4 days. That’s normal for dahlias.

We’re also picking our first marigolds, rudbeckia, zinnias, purple millet and celosia.

Enjoy!

Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 10 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 8)

July 27, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Week 10 of our 24-week summer season brings heat, smoke, and an interesting diverse harvest. In addition to harvesting for your box, we will also be gathering the first of the main season onion harvest, white and red onions. We will pull them into crates for a brief ride in the back of the pickup to dry and cure in the barn. Thus far we are solidly in the “year of the onion” at Mountain Bounty. The Walla Walla harvest was prodigious, and despite putting so many in your boxes already, we still have a great pile of those juicy monsters waiting in the barn. Yellow storage onions, the bulk of the onion crop, are still a couple weeks from being ready. While the yellow onion plants have sustained a fair bit of thrips damage, because we planted so many, even a moderate harvest will finalize this season’s onion glory.

A related, and very popular vegetable, the shallot, makes (I think) its very first appearance in Mountain Bounty CSA boxes this week. We have been experimenting with shallots for a couple of years. To describe the shallot I will quote Alice Waters:

“Shallots have a flavor that is more intense than that of sweet onions, and at the same time less hot. This means they can be used more readily raw than onions.”

A little chopped shallot is a great addition to salad dressings, sauces, and just about any savory dish come to think of it!

Thanks for supporting the farm,

John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Garlic
  • Melon
  • Eggplant- possibly, or if it’s not quite perfect then you’ll get it next week for sure.
  • Green pepper
  • Hot peppers
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Bok choy
  • Cilantro
  • Shallots

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Green pepper
  • Garlic
  • Hot pepper
  • Melon
  • Carrots
  • Bok choy
  • Shallots

RECIPES
Just click on the “live” link below each title to open the article in a new browser window. You can also highlight, then copy the address and paste it into the “go-to” address bar of a new window. If you are unfamiliar with this process, please don’t hesitate to give me a call.

23 Chilled Soups To Cool You Down
http://www.buzzfeed.com/deenashanker/these-soups-are-brrrrrrrrrrilliant#.qb67v4qg5
Gazpacho isn’t only for tomatoes! Many summer veggies make delicious chilled soups that come together quickly in a blender: corn, cucumbers, tomatoes, melons, carrots, herbs, shallots, peppers. Make a different one each night of the week from your boxes this week, with a lightly dressed salad on the side.

Chowing Down on Bok Choy! 10 Ways to Love This Asian Green
http://www.thekitchn.com/how-do-you-bok-choy-10-ways-to-love-this-asian-green-ingredient-spotlight-189203

10 Ideas for Eggplant
http://www.thekitchn.com/in-season-now-10-ideas-for-egg-154794


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we will be featuring some delicious Red Head nectarines and Zee Lady peaches from Ferrari Ranch in Linden, Ca. Both are sweet and bursting with flavor. We also have Valley Pearl table grapes from Ken’s Top Notch Produce in Reedley, Ca. These grapes are sweet and have a light champagne flavor to it that we love. We hope you have been enjoying all of your California grown organic fruit this summer! 

Spiced Rice with Nectarines
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/spiced-rice-with-nectarines-recipe.html

Peach Bellini
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/peach-bellini-recipe.html

-The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The cooler mornings this past week have been reminiscent of the fall and with August upon us it seems just around the corner. With all the main season plantings finished as of last week, we’ve got our eyes on the spring.  I’ve been going through my notes from last season and pouring over seed and bulb catalogs to make a plan for the overwintered plantings which will be our first flush of flowers in the early spring. This year I’m planning on offering a 6-week spring bulb share from mid Feb-April which will include all the gorgeous early bulbs from anemones and ranunculus to tulips and hyacinths. I’m really excited about this but am needing to get on the planning. John and I have also been scheming on planting nearly 1000 peonies in an effort to diversify our offerings (thinking retirement..). I love peonies!!

Amongst the planning we’re in the thickest harvest time of the season. Zinnias, grasses, celosia, rudbeckia, sunnies, dahlias starting to come out of our ears!!

I’ll be sending a large load down to the wholesaler in Sacramento this week and preparing for a big wedding this weekend but first will be making bouquets for You!!

Have a great week!

Enjoy!
Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 9 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 7)

July 20, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

This week we begin planting your fall broccoli! We will plant it in three waves over the next few weeks so that the harvest will hopefully spread out from early October through mid-November. At least that is the plan. Farming is a good reminder (I seem to be particularly good at forgetting this lesson) that in just about every part of life I don’t know how things are going to turn out. If the broccoli plan works out great we will rejoice! If it’s too hot or pests take over or we run out of water, well then we will rely on the many other crops that are bound to work out…Hopefully!

Fall carrots are already sprouting, and soon we will plant more kale and chard as well. We need to get these crops in the ground now, even though it’s hot here and they don’t love it, because after early August, it will be too late to plant anything besides quicker crops like spinach, lettuce, and radishes.

Coming back to the present and “summer” crops, the main season tomatoes are lagging a little, so you will probably see a temporary dip in your weekly tomatoes as the early planting wanes and before the main season crop comes on. Eggplant and the first green peppers are getting ready and should be in your boxes next week. Melons are about to go crazy, so you can look forward to at least 4-6 weeks of melons starting with the first few samples in the regular boxes this week. Corn is lining up nicely so it should be in the boxes regularly for the next couple months.

We continue to carefully meter our water use and conserve the supplies we have. The next 2 ½ months will test our abilities to adapt and scrap our way through this. Luckily, we have many years of experience scrapping our way through various farming challenges!

Enjoy those summer cucumber tomato basil salads,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Corn
  • Basil
  • Walla Walla onions
  • Garlic
  • Zucchini
  • Celery – Note that due to our growing conditions (terroir!) our celery is more strongly flavored than the stuff in the stores. It’s wonderful for soups, stews and stir-frys, but we still like it for Ants on a Log too.
  • Melon

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Corn
  • Walla Walla onion
  • Garlic
  • Celery – see note above.
  • Basil

RECIPES

Mexican Grilled Corn
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/07/mexican-street-corn-elotes-recipe.html

Walla Walla Onion Rings
http://www.lifesambrosia.com/2009/08/buttermilk-walla-walla-onion-rings-recipe.html

Ideas for Celery
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-ways-to-use-up-leftover-celery-tips-from-the-kitchn-211994


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week in your box we are featuring some Valley Pearl organic table grapes from Ken’s Top Notch Produce in Reedley, Ca. We also have organic Zee Lady peaches and Red Head nectarines from Ferrari Ranch located in Linden, Ca. Remember, it’s best to leave harder fruit out on the counter to ripen for a day or two max and then  immediately put somewhere cooler. Nectarines and peaches also freeze very well for smoothies all year long.

RECIPES

10 Peach Smoothies
http://www.womenshealthmag.com/nutrition/peach-smoothies

Grape, Celery & Blue Cheese Salad w/ Toasted Walnuts
http://www.thekitchn.com/grape-celery-bl-12881

Enjoy,
-The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The summer is just flying by. It’s hard to believe it’s almost August. I feel like we’ve all been in survival mode around here just holding our breath, hoping we can survive the drought and fire season. On the farm we’ve been implementing various water conservation techniques such as mulching, drip irrigating things that would prefer overhead, and cutting some of the plantings of the ultra thirsty crops. So far we have noticed that our well output has diminished but not too much yet. We’re crossing our fingers, hoping we can squeek by until the big winter rains come. Let’s pray that they are big this year but no flooding, please. With El Nino in mind, I’m planning my overwintered fields to be in the most well-drained parts of the farm. 

This week we’ll be planting our last block of flowers for fall harvest, staking the dahlias and the mums who tend to fall over and, of course, weeding. In your bouquets today you’ll see more outrageous queen red-lime zinnias. These have become my absolute favorite and I planted 3 x as much as I grew last year. We’re also picking dill, feathertop grass and explosion grass, celosia, a few gladiolus and a few dahlias.

Enjoy!
Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 8 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 6)

July 13, 2015

I want to thank you all so much for being members of our CSA program. As you know, your subscription is an investment in our costs to grow your food for the season, and we rely on your support to get through the harvest. Mountain Bounty Farm, Sunset Ridge Fruits, and Little Boy Flowers are small, family-run businesses who are deeply committed to bringing you the best organic produce possible. I applaud your commitment to sustainability and local economy, and for standing with us through good times and hard times both. Our recent organic certification has affected the fruit share, and Greg is working hard to connect with new growers because some of our best producers weren’t eligible for labeling (due to logistics and economics, never practice– we’ve always had sustainably grown fruit and veggies). Thanks for bearing with the change, and trusting us to bring the best produce possible to your family’s table.

~Mielle, CSA Manager

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Thank you all for the supportive emails about our farm land situation, and thank you for the pledges of financial support! I am thrilled and humbled that so many of you had so many nice things to say about the farm. I still don’t have any solid news to share, but within a week or two I hope to have some news. For those of you who missed last week’s newsletter and are wondering what I’m talking about, you can read it on our website under the headings “Post Categories” and “Summer Newsletters.”

As we get into sweet corn season, I’d like to do my yearly spiel about the worms in the corn. The Helicoverpa Zea moth is lively little creature that seems to be able to lay eggs on just about every ear of corn in our fields. Those eggs hatch into caterpillars that crawl down the corn silk into the tip of the ear and start making a mess. Another kind of caterpillar tunnels into the side of some of the ears.  For years, we invested tremendous time and money trying to control these caterpillars using a very laborious organic method. Unfortunately, despite our best efforts, it rarely worked. So we gave up trying to stop them.

Every year we get large numbers of complaints about worms and other damage to the corn. Last year, we experimented with cutting the tips off of most of the corn, which seemed to make most people happier. We will continue to do that again this year. However, sometimes the worms come in from the side of the ear and damage an area in the middle of the ear. So, there will be imperfections on your sweet corn. I encourage everyone to look at the bright sides of this situation:

  1. Despite those darn caterpillars, usually 90% of the ear is fine and delicious. If any part of the ear seems bad to you, please just cut it off with a sharp knife and proceed to enjoy the rest.
  2. Organic sweet corn is a big-time treat. Most CSA’s don’t grow it because it takes a lot of space to grow (and is thus less profitable for the farmer) and because of the worm issue.
  3. We love sweet corn and we know that you do too, that’s why we grow a lot of it!

Happy summer,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Scallions
  • Tomatoes
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Beets
  • Corn
  • Rainbow chard
  • Cherry tomatoes
  • Carrots

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Scallions
  • Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  • Beets
  • Corn
  • Carrots

RECIPES

Info on Chioggia Beets + Recipes
http://communitytable.parade.com/232768/linzlowe/what-the-heck-is-a-chioggia-beet/

Swiss Chard Wrapped Salmon
http://wellnessmama.com/5023/chard-wrapped-salmon/

Quick Pickle Cucumbers with Rice Vinegar
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/10/quick-pickled-cucumbers-rice-vinegar-recipe.html


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we are featuring yellow peaches, white nectarines, and pluots again. We have been loving the quality of Ferrari Ranch’s diamond princess yellow peaches and hope you have been too. Chopped peaches on cereal is one of our personal breakfast favorites! These arctic jay nectarines also dry well and taste great. Here’s a recipe for a crisp you can make with the fruit this week:

Nectarine-and-Plum Crisp with Oatmeal Streusel
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/nectarine-and-plum-crisp-with-oatmeal-streusel

Hope you all have a great week!
~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The past few weeks have been such a scurry to get all the planting and seeding done before the window closes. With our limited space it was a real struggle to figure out where everything would go, especially since I planted twice as many dahlias this year as I have in the past. The dahlias are growing well and should start producing blooms for you in the next couple of weeks. My favorite varieties are the ball types which seem to hold up best (dahlias are not the best keepers), and I also grow some big dinnerplates for event work- Cafe au Lait is a favorite of all of the brides these days.

My love for dahlias is not lost on the fact that they are a total pain in the butt to grow. Firstly, you have to dig and store them in a frost- free, not too damp environment. This can be super challenging and year after year I’ve consistently lost maybe half of my tubers to rot in storage. I’m getting better at this now and have realized you just need to check them every few weeks and remove the infected ones before they spread. If you have a home garden and super well drained soil, you may be able to leave yours in the ground over winter. This, however, makes your tubers more prone to rotting in the soil and to gophers, who love them. Digging them and storing them also allows you to divide the tubers and multiply your number of plants. You can find some good tutorials of how to propagate tubers online. Anyhow, all this plus staking and then digging them after they die back naturally from frost, which is usually a super mucky, cold job, makes dahlia growing  a labor of love. Their incredible, succulent, textured blooms make it all worthwhile. Yay, dahlias!

This week you won’t have any dahlias quite yet (Sorry, to get you all excited), you will be seeing lots more gorgeous zinnias. A new variety for me is the uproar rose which is a gorgeous rose-pink color, also white cosmos, perhaps some gladiolus (though the gophers devoured my first planting, Yikes!), purple basil, feverfew and some other goodies.

Thanks for supporting our flower adventures! Hope you’re enjoying the flowers.

— Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

 

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Week 7 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 5)

July 7, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

HELP SAVE THE FARM!

Dear Farm Members,

As many of you know, most of the land we farm is leased. This is because the economic realities of farming make buying land very difficult and because land that is suitable for farming is quite rare in our area.  Over the years, as we moved from one spot to the next every few years, I have semi- jokingly called our approach “guerilla farming.” Basically, the idea has been, if we can’t have the ideal farm location, we might as well do the best we can. That started to change in 2010, when we finally secured a lease on the Birchville Road fields. In the last five years these fields have become the jewel of the neighborhood and have enabled us to take the farm to a very high level.

For the past two months I have been engaged in a stressful dance with the owners of those fields. Since their family patriarch, and our dear friend, Howard Miser, passed away in February, his heirs want to sell the property, which is both a threat and an opportunity for us. We have a lease agreement that lasts through 2020, but they are now citing a technicality to try to invalidate our lease. So I have been working with lawyers, bankers, and realtors to both try to preserve our lease and, possibly, purchase the property. The importance of the Birchville fields to the farm is hard to overstate. Simply, these fields represent the best three quarters of the land we are cultivating. We have also invested heavily in improving the land, because that is a big part of our mission as a farm and based on the perceived security of the lease.

There has been, and continues to be, so much uncertainty in this process that I have been reluctant to share what is going on. However, at the urging of some friends, I am now asking for your help. If we are able to come to an agreement with the owners, it will be for an amount that is difficult for us to afford alone. I would like to ask you all to consider investing in the farm. The gap between what we can afford, including what banks will loan us, and what the cost of the property will be, is likely going to be as much as $100,000. This may sound like a lot, but given what the farm offers to the community, maybe it is achievable. For example, if all 600 Mountain Bounty subscribers contributed $166 each, that would do it! Of course not everyone can contribute, and some can invest substantially more.

In addition to helping support us by buying a share of the produce, why should you invest further in the farm? In recent years there has been a tremendous increase in interest in local food and a proliferation of small local farms.  Mountain Bounty has been a leader in this movement and indeed many of the other local farmers got their start working here. Despite the many challenges inherent in starting and surviving as a farm, we have tenaciously held on and steadily grown over the past 18 years. Due to the bounty and quality made possible by the Birchville fields, we are now producing perhaps more than all the other local farms combined. So investing in Mountain Bounty is a strong investment in preserving our local food supply. If we were to lose these fields it would be a blow to us and our crew, but also a big blow to local food security.

Creating a strong and thriving Community Supported Agriculture farm has been my dream for a long time. I am proud of our successes and especially proud that we have been able to produce so much good food so consistently, while at the same time supporting the numerous families that now make up the farm crew. Please help us preserve this success so that we can continue to serve you with abundant good food for a long time to come.

In future newsletters I will let you know how the negotiations play out and if we are able to move forward, I will be making a more specific appeal for help. So until then, please enjoy the food, and hold us in your hearts.

Thanks for your support,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

REGULAR BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Green beans
  • Corn!  — This will be a lighter first harvest, don’t worry there is lots more to come!
  • Cucumbers
  • Garlic
  • Sungold cherry tomatoes
  • Basil
  • Cilantro
  • Zucchini
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla onion
  • Early red tomatoes

SMALL BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Corn! — This will be a lighter first harvest, don’t worry there is lots more to come!
  • Cucumbers
  • Garlic
  • Sungold cherry tomatoes
  • Basil
  • Carrots
  • Early red tomatoes

RECIPES

CILANTRO BASIL PESTO PASTA
http://www.veganfamilyrecipes.com/2014/11/cilantro-basil-pesto-pasta.html
This would also be great with all basil replacing the cilantro, perhaps skip the ginger.

TOMATO SALAD WITH CORN, SUMMER SQUASH AND ROASTED ONIONS
http://food52.com/recipes/23677-tomato-salad-with-corn-summer-squash-and-roasted-onions
Small-box members, try this with your cucumber in place of the squash!


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

Hope everyone had a great holiday weekend! For week 5 we have Arctic Jay white nectarines and Diamond Princess yellow peaches from Ferrari Ranch in Linden, Ca. We also have Dapple Fire pluots from Wild River Marketing in Marysville, Ca.

Now that we are getting into July, white peaches should be coming shortly! So enjoy the yellow peaches while they last. Firmer fruit will soften on your counter top in a few days. If you choose to refrigerate softer fruit to make it last longer, know that refrigeration damages the texture and flavor of stonefruits (peaches and nectarines).  Eating all the fruit at its optimal stage is a delicate balance. We usually prefer to leave it all unrefrigerated and accept that a couple pieces might need to end up in a smoothie. Enjoy!

~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

I just returned from a fabulous flower filled weekend in Carmel where I was working for one of my mentors, Kate Holt, of Flowerwild. For the wedding we worked for 4 days putting together the most outrageous floral designs filled with garden roses, peonies and lots of foraged greens from the roadsides. The end result was an event full of lush, wild looking arrangements that blended in well with the old barn and courtyard.

Back on the farm this morning I was feeling super grateful to be connected in a much deeper way with the flowers I work with. The floral industry, though full of beauty, is also very reliant on chemicals, loads of fossil fuels and results in a disconnect between most growers and designers.

Though my flowers might not be as sexy as peonies and garden roses ( both of which I do grow but are already past their season) the flowers I grow are all mindfully grown and harvested by people who love the work.

Today we harvested purple basil, Didiscus, zinnias, sunnies, feverfew, dianthus and celosia. Enjoy!

A few tips for keeping your flowers fresh: Keep changing your water every few days so your flowers stay fresh. Some flowers are shorter lived than others so also remember to pull the ones out that expire before the others.

— Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

 

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Week 6 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 4)

June 30, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

What to report this week? It’s very hot and dusty, and the crew is working to keep things watered and cope with the challenging conditions. Things are growing so fast in the long hot days! Maybe I’ll have more to say when my brain cools off…

Thanks for all your support,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR BOXES THIS WEEK: 

Things are in a little more flux this week than they have been so please remember that these lists are an approximate prediction of what will be in your boxes – we may have to make some last minute adjustments.

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Fruit boxes are white.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuces
  • Zucchini
  • Green beans
  • Parsley OR dill
  • Carrots
  • Sungold cherry tomatoes!
  • Rainbow chard
  • Walla Walla onion
  • Cucumbers!

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Green beans
  • Parsley OR dill
  • Sungold cherry tomatoes!
  • Rainbow chard
  • Walla Walla onion

RECIPES

Buttermilk Ranch Salad Dressing
Salad time! Make a big batch of delicious dressing and enjoy easy salads all week. This one makes use of the fresh herbs in your box this week too, and doubles as a great dip for raw or lightly steamed veggies like green beans, carrots, and cucumbers:
http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/buttermilk-ranch-dressing/

Barbecued Walla Walla Onions
We love to eat our Walla Wallas simply BBQ’d with a brush of olive oil and/or balsamic vinegar… here’s a recipe with a scrumptious honey-mustard glaze:
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/bbq-onion-steaks-with-honey-mustard-sauce-235354

Chard Stem Hummus
Here’s a hummus-like dip to make use of those chard stems, thanks to member Jacquie Bellon for sharing!
http://food52.com/blog/13337-a-genius-trick-for-lighter-smoother-hummus?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=4620814&utm_campaign=20150628_hybrid_sunday_digest


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we are featuring Dapple Fire pluots from Wild River Fruit in Yuba City, Ca. They are a family farm of five decades! In addition to these delicious pluots, Wild River grows citrus, kiwi, and plums along the Yuba River. Check them out at wildriverfruit.com, they have great culinary uses for plots.

We also have some very sweet white nectarines called Arctic Jay and Sierra Rich yellow peaches from Ferrari Ranch in Linden, Ca. A lot of this fruit is soft and ready to eat so you may want to keep it in a cool place and eat it right up!

We endeavor to provide a combination of levels of ripeness in your boxes but we apologize if you received overly firm fruit in the last couple of weeks. We work hard to make sure you receive high quality fruit but please let Mielle know if you are ever anything less than satisfied with the produce you receive.

Have a great week!
-The crew at Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

The fields are filling up with blooms and the weeds are going crazy. Our first block of early spring flowers are getting mowed down this week and the late fall block of flowers are getting seeded in the greenhouse. Additionally,  we’ve got a long list of tasks ahead of us: big field planting, wholesale orders to fill, wedding orders, staking dahlias, and of course the watering and weeding. Since I work only 3-4 days a week my work days are pretty jam packed. Thank goodness I have a few great helpers this year. Since we have 3 different sites, it can be a bit of a nightmare to manage all the tasks. Harvests always happen first thing in the morning and all the flowers get brought to our home site where my cooler and flower studio are. After harvesting, we prioritize from our list and launch into the rest of the work. Though we work hard and fast, we still enjoy lots of great conversation while working in the field together. Farm therapy, I like to call it.

In your bouquets today you will have bupleurum, zinnias, purple millet, dianthus, the last snapdragons, rudbeckia and crocosmia and maybe some more surprises…

Have a great week!
-Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

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Week 5 Summer 2015 (Fruits & Flowers Week 3)

June 22, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Happy Solstice everyone! Every year at this time I marvel at the amazingly long days and the intensity that the height of summer brings to the farm. So many weeds, so much harvesting! And while spring plantings are finished, we are now on to fall. Even as one season peaks, we must prepare for the next. In the last couple weeks the crew seeded the bulk of the fall brassica family (broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower) into planting trays where they will grow in a semi-shady spot near our greenhouse until ready to transplant. And we are now in the time window for field seeding of carrots and beets for fall. We will do these seedings until mid-July and then start transplanting the fall brassicas, which need to all be in the ground by early August. All this before tomatoes have started to produce much! We may have enough Sungold cherry tomatoes and a few early reds to start harvesting for your boxes next week, with many more to come soon. Green beans are also starting next week. And the first corn will be ready in a couple of weeks.  Summer is so busy, dusty, and hot here that it can be hard to enjoy. I am trying to relish the early morning and evening hours when things are cooler and quieter. And of course all the amazing food and wonderful people that have gathered around the farm.

With thanks,
John Tecklin

Billy moving lettuce to the barn where it will be washed and put in the cooler.

Billy moving lettuce to the barn where it will be washed and put in the cooler.

 

The 2015 Mountain Bounty crew.

It’s a little bit like herding cats, but we got everyone in one place — the 2015 Mountain Bounty crew.

IN YOUR BOXES THIS WEEK 

Due to the dynamic nature of farming, we sometimes make last-minute decisions to change an item in your box, so this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive.

Please note: There are 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Fruit boxes are white.

REGULAR VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Arugula
  • Cilantro
  • Walla Walla onions
  • Garlic
  • Cabbage
  • Dino Kale

SMALL VEGGIE BOX:

  • Lettuce
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla onions
  • Garlic
  • Cabbage
  • Dino Kale

RECIPES

Beet & Goat Cheese Arugula Salad
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/beet-and-goat-cheese-arugula-salad-recipe.html

Chicken and Cabbage Tacos with Cilantro Cream
(Substitute our smooth green cabbage for red cabbage)
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/september-2007-chicken-and-cabbage-tacos-with-cilantro-cream

Thai Peanut Zucchini Noodles
http://www.scalingbackblog.com/savory-bites/thai-peanut-zucchini-noodles/


NEWS FROM SUNSET RIDGE FINE FRUITS

This week we are featuring a variety of fruit from D.E. Boldt, located in the town of Parlier. This small organic farm has stayed within the family since 1912 and is now run by David and Dorothy Boldt with the help of their three sons. They are a CCOF certified grower whose priority it is to make the smallest possible impact on the environment.

First we have Bright Princess peaches, a late ripening variety of yellow peach that has great flavor. We also have Hiromi Red plums, a delicious red flesh fruit that is packed with health promoting vitamins and minerals. Lastly we have our first round of nectarines, called Grand Bright Yellow. Chop up a little bit of each to make a wonderful fruit salad!

Each week our goal is to find the highest quality fruit for you and your family. It is important to us not only to find growers who are organic, but those who are sustainable as well. We hope you enjoy this weeks’ bounty of California grown organic fruit!

~The fruit crew at Sunset Ridge
www.gotmandarins.com


NEWS FROM LITTLE BOY FLOWERS

Happy Summer Solstice! The longest day of the year has come and gone and slowly but surely the days will get shorter and shorter. Yay! I’m over the hump. Well, almost. The next four weeks are critical for me to get all the rest of my seeding and plantings done before the days get too short for the crops to mature. I’ll also start the seeding of all of my overwintered biennials like delphiniums, dianthus and foxgloves which will get put out in the field in September.

The fields are brimming with flowers. The early spring crops are on their way out but all the main season flowers are happy and coming into bloom. My first round of sunflowers is opening up as are my zinnias, cosmos, bells of ireland, various grasses and snapdragons.

After our morning harvest today we will be planting the 4the round of sunflowers into the field. We usually plant between 8 and 10 rounds of sunflowers, each 2 weeks apart from each other. My favorite sunflowers to use are the Pro Cut gold but I also grow the Starburst lemon yellow and panache varieties. You’ll be seeing the Pro Cut gold sunflowers in your bouquets today.

That’s all for now, have a great week and enjoy the bright colors of summer!

A few tips for keeping your flowers fresh:
Keep changing your water every few days so your flowers stay fresh. Some flowers are shorter lived than others so also remember to pull the ones out that expire before the others.

Angie Tomey
www.littleboyflowers.com

 

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