Week 6, Summer 2016

June 27, 2016

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Thanks to all who came out to the farm festival on Sunday. Despite the heat, the event was a success! It was probably our best attended farm event in several years. The farm slide, straw bale fort and face painting booth were very popular. The fire breathing dragon, however, only attracted the bravest kids and adults. It’s always great to get folks out to the farm and share what we are doing.Dragon

In the fields this week, we continue with many farm chores like tying up tomatoes, seeding, transplanting, and of course weeding. The weeding battle has started to shift in our favor, but will continue for the rest of the season. This week we’ll pick the first bulbing onions of the season, the Walla Walla sweets. Last year we had an incredible bumper crop of these fatties. Those of you who were members last summer may remember receiving them in your boxes for over two months. This year it’s the opposite and we’ll be lucky to have two weeks’ worth. Luckily, the main season onions are looking good and should be ready to harvest starting in late July or early August. In the meantime, for your allium pleasure we will have more scallions, garlic, and perhaps a few early leeks.

This week’s boxes are the final purely “spring” boxes of the season. Summer’s heat is upon us and green beans and cherry tomatoes may be ready for next week. At the same time, the greens and brassicas (broccoli/cabbage family) are less happy about the heat and waning quickly. Corn and melons are just a few weeks away…

Thanks for your support,

John Tecklin
Mountain Bounty Farm

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX

  • Broccoli – last harvest until the fall.
  • Kale
  • Lettuces
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla sweet onions
  • Napa Cabbage
  • Cucumbers
  • Zucchini
  • Arugula
  • Oregano
  • Basil

SMALL BOX:

  • Small Broccoli – last harvest until the fall.
  • Small bunch Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Carrots
  • Walla Walla sweet onion
  • Small Napa Cabbage
  • Cucumber
  • Arugula
  • Basil

FRUIT SHARE NEWS

In the box this week we have a beautiful and delicious variety of Ice princess white peach. Also:

  • Crimson lady yellow peach
  • Kay pearl white nectarine
  • Emerald gem pluot green
  • Ebony rose Pluot black
  • Honey blaze yellow nectarine

All of these come from Ken’s Top Notch Produce farm in Reedley, California. We hope you enjoy all of these treats.

Enjoy,
– Your fruit packing friends of Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits
(916) 663-9158
www.gotmandarins.com

FLOWER SHARE NEWS

Last week’s heat pushed nearly everything into bloom and we’re swimming in blooms right now (finally!). It’s been a bit of a stressful, late spring for me so I’m super excited to see so many flowers opening up and ready to send out into the world. Crazy enough we still have some of the early spring flowers like sweet peas still hanging on whereas usually they are long finished by this time. I imagine after this week of high nineties, we will be pulling them out. This week we’re planting the second half of our late season field which is full of dahlias, lisianthus, rudbeckia and asters right now. We have another huge planting of zinnias to put out as well as the rest of our chrysanthemums. Besides the weekly tasks of planting and harvesting we have to continually keep up with the weeds as well as stay on top of the greenhouse seedings. Lots to be done! We’re looking forward to having our 3 interns who start next week!

This week your bouquets will be abundant with all kinds of gorgeous blooms from godetia to zinnias, grasses and queen anne’s lace and maybe the first sunflowers and the last of the sweet peas.

A note about flower longevity. Some flowers will naturally fade before others. When making up your bouquets I try to compose them of a nice blend of short lived flowers (dahlias) and longer lived flowers (zinnias). In order to help your flowers last longer, make sure you change your water once or twice, keep it full, and remove dead and dying blooms. Recutting the stems may help. Most importantly keep them out of the sun.

Enjoy,

Angie Tomey
Web: littleboyflowers.com
Phone: 530-277-5877
Email: info@littleboyflowers.com

RECIPES

Walla Walla Onions

These sweet onions are so easy to love. Bbq them with your zucchini and a dash of balsamic for an easy delicious side dish, or try these recipes:

More BBQ inspiration for this week’s box:

Napa Cabbage

We gave you a recipe for kimchi a couple weeks ago, but this one is even easier. It’s a delicious way to get probiotics into your diet and preserve the bounty of your summer veggies:

These protein salads looks great:

And another salad you can make from this week’s box, replace the red onions with your sweet walla wallas:

CSA-inspired beverages

Try adding some of the stone fruits from your fruit box this week too!

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 5, Summer 2016

June 20, 2016

Harvest Festival June 26RSVP on Facebook

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

In addition to our myriad normal farm tasks this week, we are preparing for this coming Sunday’s farm festival! We’re building a straw bale fort, setting up slides made from rolling conveyor tables (kids and the young at heart ride down these sitting in a farm harvest crate), making a piñata, watering down some of the dust, and gathering all the other kid activity stuff. Personally, I am most excited about the fire breathing dragon.

It will a warm day so please bring sun hats and water bottles. For those of you who haven’t yet visited our Birchville Road fields, many of the activities will be under a Giant oak tree that has plenty of shade. The fields are full of lush produce, so come check it out! Please see the poster below for more details.

Hope to see you there,

John Tecklin
Mountain Bounty Farm

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX

  • Rainbow chard
  • Little gem lettuces
  • Fennel
  • Savoy cabbage “Alcosa”
  • Middle Eastern Cucumbers
  • Italian flat leaf parsley
  • Garlic
  • Yukina Savoy – this is a close relative of Tatsoi, a tender Asian green. You can eat it raw or very lightly sautéed, like bok choy
  • Radishes
  • Dill
  • Scallions

SMALL BOX

  • Rainbow chard—smaller bunch
  • Little gem lettuce
  • Small Fennel
  • Small Savoy cabbage “Alcosa”
  • Middle Eastern Cucumbers
  • Italian flat leaf parsley
  • Garlic
  • Small bunch Yukina Savoy – this is a close relative of Tatsoi, a tender Asian green. You can eat it raw or very lightly sautéed, like bok choy

FRUIT SHARE NEWS

Happy Summer Solstice all. This first day of summer kind of launches us into more and better summer fruit. The hot days and warm nights are what peach and stone fruit farmers need to have in order to ripened and sweeten their fruit.

For week 3 of the Summer Fruit CSA we have a great variety of fruits from Ken’s Top Notch Produce located in Reedley, Ca. The yellow peaches are Crimson Lady, the white peaches are Ice Princess. The yellow nectarines are called Honey Blaze, and white nectarines are Ice Princess. The pluots are called Ebony Rose.

The Patterson Apricots in the box are from Blossom Hill Farm located in Patterson, Ca. We hope you and your family enjoy all these tasty fruits of the California summer.

Enjoy,

-The fruit packing crew of Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits
(916) 663-9158
www.gotmandarins.com

FLOWER SHARE NEWS

Yay, It’s flower time!!

Though the flowers have been a little late to come on this year, we are starting to get buried in blooms. All the flowers that are happening now were planted in February. We start all the blooms in our greenhouse and then they get transplanted out into the field. I do have a few hoop houses that we use mostly for our overwintered crops like ranunculus and anemones, though I do have the dahlias and chrysanthemums planted in one of them right now, as well as an early planting of zinnias.  For the most part, by mid-summer it gets too hot in those hoop houses for the flowers.

Other flower news is that we have three 15-year old girls participating in our month-long internship on the farm this summer: Grace, Ashlee, and Sienna. They start work in July and will be helping out 3 days a week plus doing some wedding work with us on the weekends. I’m really excited about passing on some of my wisdom about running a business, organic farming, greenhouse management, crop selections and floral design.

We have 2 sponsors so far who have committed to paying the $400 stipend for two of our participants so we are still looking for one more sponsor for Ashlee. If you’re interested, send over an email and I’ll give you some more information about our program.

See you at the Farm Festival this Sunday!!!

Thanks for your support,
Angie Tomey
Web: littleboyflowers.com
Phone: 530-277-5877
Email: info@littleboyflowers.com

RECIPES

FENNEL
I visited Italy all too briefly many years ago, where I had one of the best meals of my life. It consisted of mostly small plates of individually prepared vegetables, one of which was a savory braised fennel. Try your hand at it, at the second link below.

  • Learning To Love Fennel: A Personal Journey
    “There are VERY few things I won’t eat: olives, Nutella (I know, I know), and up until about a month ago, fennel. One whiff off those wispy little fronds was enough to send me running in the other direction. I thought I’d tried it every way: raw, roasted, sautéed in as much butter as I could use to mask its flavor. There was one cooking preparation, however, that until recently I had never tried…”

SAVOY CABBAGE – “ALCOSA”
From Martha Stewart: Savoys have a more delicate flavor than basic green cabbages, and many cooks like to use them in recipes that call for green cabbage. The cabbages also stand out for their distinctive nubby leaves, which hang a bit loosely from the head. Because the leaves are broad, they work well as wrappers for ground meat and other stuffings.

HERBS
Parsley is such a nutritious herb, very high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Italian flat-leaf parsley is more flavorful than the more bitter common curly type. You can use much more of this blood-cleansing powerhouse if you mince it very finely… sprinkle lots of it over salads, eggs, pasta, or anywhere you want a savory and nutritious boost.

YUKINA SAVOY & CHARD

  • Sauteed Chard Agrodolce
    “Agrodolce is Italian for sour-sweet flavors typically created with vinegar and sugar. It’s a perfect counterpoint to sautéed greens in this quick and simple side dish.”

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 4, Summer 2016

June 14, 2016

Mark your calendars for the return of our fabulous Summer Farm Festival on Sunday, June 26… it’s a super-fun family event!

Harvest Festival June 26Click here for more info.

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

This week’s farm theme is “weeding forever.” For the duration of my 22 years of farming, there has always been a period during the season (sometimes shorter, sometimes longer!) when the weeds go on a winning streak. It can be a little scary. I try to impress on the newer farmers that it’s kind of like with zombies: they come after you, it’s a total nightmare, you fight back, and eventually the good guys win! Typically the weeds are in retreat by sometime around mid-July. But they never really go away…

We battle weeds in a variety of ways. We start with flaming; using a 30” wide, five burner propane torch to kill very small weeds that have germinated before our crop seed comes up. The beauty of flaming is that is doesn’t disturb the soil, which means that other weed seeds stay down below and can’t make it to the surface. Our next tool is a 1950 Allis Chalmers model G tractor. This unique spider-looking creature was only made for a few years and is highly sought after by small organic farmers like us. The G is very small, very light, and has the motor mounted behind the driver which allows us to see what we are doing and make precise adjustments.  I converted our G to run on an electric motor. The G reduces hoeing and hand weeding by 50-75% depending on how well we time its use. And then we do a lot of hoeing. Finally, on crops that are more closely spaced or for a variety of other reasons, there is hand-weeding. We do a lot of hand-weeding too. The result: fields full of beautiful and easy to harvest Organic produce!

Enjoy!
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX

  • Scallions
  • Lettuces
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Garlic
  • Cauliflower – Cauliflower is difficult to grow in our climate, we aim for cauliflower once in the spring and once in the fall, and we see it as a bonus if it works out. Success!
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Dino aka Lacinato kale
  • Cucumbers – we grow mostly fancy and delicate Middle Eastern types – no need to peel like the tough and waxed cucumbers from the store. This week’s varieties: “Adam”, “Amiga”, and “Diva.”

SMALL BOX

  • Small bunch scallions
  • Small lettuce
  • Small bunch beets
  • Garlic
  • Small cauliflower! – Cauliflower is difficult to grow in our climate, we aim for cauliflower once in the spring and once in the fall, and we see it as a bonus if it works out. Success!
  • Carrots
  • Small bunch Dino aka Lacinato kale
  • Cucumbers — we grow mostly fancy and delicate Middle Eastern types – no need to peel like the tough and waxed cucumbers from the store. This week’s varieties: “Adam”, “Amiga”, and “Diva.”

FRUIT SHARE NEWS

As we get into our second week of fruit we want to give some storage tips to help make your fruit last longer. The most important thing is to pick up your fruit CSA as soon as you can, and then get it to cold storage at home as soon as possible. Ripe fruit is already in the beginning stages of breaking down, so the sooner you can get the fruit into cold storage the better. Firm fruit can be left out at room temp for a while to help it soften, but watch them closely.

Peaches are probably the fruit we prize the most and try to include every week. We think that the perfect peach is the best fruit of summer.  But they are a delicate and fragile piece of fruit. They are the hardest fruit for us to pick, pack and deliver to you in the “just right” condition. We stress over and work hard to get you peaches that are just slightly soft to the touch. Hang time on the tree is key for a peach to ripen and flavor up properly. Picked too early and there is no flavor and they do not ripen/soften correctly. Picked too late or too much hang time on the tree and the fruit goes bad very quickly.  We work with all growers to monitor each crop and variety of peaches to try and get it just right. The window to get in and pick at just the right time is a couple of days one way or the other.  We want to provide you with peaches (and other fruits as well)  that are just right. We know that we will not always get it perfect. We are working hard to limit that experience.

The fruit share is comprised of 7 pounds of organic fruit. Because we try to get you ripe fruit and not rock hard fruit, we know that some pieces of fruit will not hold up. Therefore we intentionally load up your boxes with extra fruit to 8+ pounds each week to try to compensate for fruit that may ripen too quickly. If you are ever dissatisfied with the quality of your box, please send Mielle an email and we are happy to give you a refund.

In the box this week we have Sweet Scarlett Peaches and Zee Diamond Nectarines from Feather River Farms in Yuba City, plus Patterson Apricots from Blossom Hill Orchard.

Enjoy.

-The fruit packing crew of Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits
(916) 663-9158
www.gotmandarins.com

RECIPES 

Click recipe titles for links to the full recipes.

BEETS & DIPPING

I helped cater a wedding yesterday and this beautiful dip was on the appetizer table with crudite (raw veggies for dipping). It’s a great way to add iron from the beets to an already nutrient-rich dip:

Here’s another delicious dip for raw veggies:

Whenever I use cauliflower, broccoli, or other tough veggies like green beens on a crudite platter, I always give them a quick blanch to make them more digestible, brightly colored, and nicer to eat:

  • To blanch, immerse vegetables in boiling water briefly, then shock (see below). I usually salt the water heavily so that the vegetables take some on, helping their flavor stand out. The water should taste as salty as the ocean!
  • To shock blanched vegetables, plunge them immediately into a bath of ice water. This important step stops the cooking process and keeps them bright and firm.

SCALLIONS, GARLIC, AND SALADS

CAULIFLOWER

“Adding puréed cauliflower to an appetizer-sized soufflé gives the dish the heartiness to be a vegetarian main when served with a salad:”

KALE

Here’s a link to a blog by an inspired vegetable-lover who has something to tell us about kale, including her recipes listed below:

  • How I Learned to Love Dino Kale
    Kale Salad with Apricots, Avocado, and Parmesan
    Easy Turkey Chili with Kale
    Spiced Lentil, Sweet Potato, and Kale Whole Wheat Pockets
    Braised Lentils and Chard Topped with an Egg (I use kale!)
    Savory Stuffed Sweet Potatoes with White Beans and Kale

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 3, Summer 2016 | First week of summer fruit boxes!

June 6, 2016

Mark your calendars for the return of our fabulous Summer Farm Festival on Sunday, June 26… it’s a super-fun family event!

Harvest Festival June 26Click here for more info.

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,
This week on the farm, we will be planting out our final tomato succession of the season. We plant this late succession to make sure that you have plenty of tomatoes in the fall when the earlier plantings (coming soon!) begin to wind down. Tomatoes require a lot of ongoing maintenance since they grow so quickly. All of our tomatoes are trellised by placing steel t-posts every second or third plant and then tying horizontal strings every week to push the plants up into a hedge. This way we can keep the tomatoes neatly up and off the ground and also walk between the rows to harvest.

Later this week, we will also seed many trays of broccoli, cauliflower, and kale for the fall. I’ve probably mentioned this multiple times in past years, but I am continually interested in how seasons overlap. Just as summer is barely beginning, we are already preparing for fall.

Thanks for your support!
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX:

  • Garlic – see last week’s newsletter for notes on the garlic
  • Lettuce
  • Broccoli
  • Red Russian Kale
  • Hakurei salad Turnips
  • Bok choy
  • Basil
  • Zucchini
  • Green cabbage
  • Cucumbers
  • Spinach

SMALL BOX:

  • Garlic — see last week’s newsletter for notes on the garlic
  • Lettuce
  • Broccoli
  • Red Russian Kale
  • Hakurei salad Turnips
  • Bok choy
  • Zucchini
  • Green cabbage

FRUIT SHARE NEWS

Welcome to the first box of our 18-week summer CSA fruit share. We will be bringing you a variety of fruits from the foothills and the valleys this summer. First up are Rainer Cherries from Mountain Sweet Farm in Oregon House. We are fortunate to get ahold of these cherries because the cherry harvest season was hammered by spring rains. Enjoy…we don’t know yet if we’ll be able to locate more.

Next we have Patterson Apricots from Blossom Hill Orchards in Patterson…great for eating, drying, etc. We also have Springtime yellow peaches, Arctic Mist White Nectarines, and Roseanne Pluots from Feather River Farms in Yuba City.

Enjoy these tastes of summer!

-The fruit packing crew of Sunset Ridge Fine Fruits
(916) 663-9158
www.gotmandarins.com

RECIPES

Click recipe titles for links to the full recipes.

HAKUREI SALAD TURNIPS
These are one of those specialty crops that you will probably only find in your CSA… because farmers know what’s good to eat! These turnips are sweet and tender, nothing like their strong-flavored winter cousins. I love to eat them sliced and plain– they’re sweet and crunchy like a cucumber. This link has a few suggestions for using them in recipes along with their mild greens:

Here’s another Japanese-inspired recipe that also looks tasty:

Or try them pickled, always a hit:

BOK CHOY
Either of these recipes would be a great side dish with an Asian-inspired meal, perhaps the Kung-Pao Chicken in the first link (or sub tofu for vegetarians).

CABBAGE
Fermented foods are a great way to add probiotics to your diet, and are delicious and easy to make with all kinds of produce from your CSA box. Once you learn the basic method, you can add all kinds of different veggies and seasonings.

Here’s a couple more inspirations for your head of cabbage this week:

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 2, Summer 2016

May 30, 2016

We hope you can join us this Thursday for a Sierra Harvest Potluck at our Birchville fields, and mark your calendars for the return of our fabulous Summer Farm Festival on June 26!

  • Click here for more info about Thursday’s potluck
  • Click here for more info about our Summer Farm Festival on June 26

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Last week we harvested this year’s garlic crop. It was a fun process, check out the photo below and video (Click here for the Youtube video link). The good news is there is a lot of it. The bad news is it’s not a great quality crop. So it goes with farming. Each season we experience mostly awe inspiring successes, and a portion of…some other stuff. Now the garlic is drying, heaped up on about 50 pallets in a shady spot. In about two weeks we will trim off the tops and start giving it out in your boxes. You will see a bunch of it that is shaped differently than you may have seen before, the bulbs are more open and don’t have their outer skins. Much of it matured surprisingly early and was affected by a deformity called “witches brooming,” that separates the cloves. Both of these issues may have been caused by how we stored the seed garlic prior to planting. We thought we were being smart storing it in one of the coolers, but we may have over chilled it. While maybe not as attractive to look at, and not long keeping, this garlic is easier to peel, still tastes great, and there should be plenty of it to last through the summer months.

garlicThis week, summer weather is finally upon us and the abundance of greens continues…

Thanks for your support,

John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX:

  • Carrots
  • Scallions
  • Fennel – for all you fennel doubters out there, just try slicing it fairly thinly into a salad, you’ll be amazed.
  • Zucchini
  • Lettuce
  • Dino aka Lacinato aka Nero di Toscano Kale
  • Cilantro
  • Radishes
  • Broccoli
  • Arugula
  • Spinach – spinach has a short season here is the spring and fall. We love and admire this spinach, Enjoy it while you can!

SMALL BOX:

  • Carrots
  • Scallions
  • Fennel
  • Lettuce
  • Dino aka Lacinato aka Nero di Toscano Kale
  • Cilantro
  • Radishes
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach

RECIPES
Click recipe titles for links to the full recipes.

This week’s box could make for some yummy taco accompaniments:

If you don’t yet love fennel, this recipe is sure to turn you over:

  • Roasted Fennel with ParmesanAlthough slices of raw fennel are plenty delicious and sweet, roasting it with strong aged cheese is a sure-thing for just about anyone!

And, here’s a great recipe to use the same concept to add to a delicious warm grain salad:

~
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 1, Summer 2016

May 23, 2016

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

Welcome to Mountain Bounty Farm’s 19th summer CSA season! We have been planning, planting, and tending the fields and greenhouses since early January to bring you this season’s bounty. Once again, we have a wonderful crew with eight veterans returning from past seasons, and five new interns that joined in early April to round out the group.  It’s an exciting time on the farm, full of promise. Perhaps that’s how farming is – always something growing, changing, always lively!

After several years of drought, it’s amazing how a winter with average rainfall can refresh our local water supply. While many parts of California are still in historic drought mode, here locally, and for this season, it looks like we have plenty of water. And the nice, cool, “normal” spring means perfect greens weather. The fields, and really our whole area, are so lush, green, and lovely right now.

So what to expect from the farm this season? Coming soon: carrots, more lettuces, broccoli (lots!), cauliflower, cabbage, fennel, garlic, cucumbers, and many other greens! And starting a little later, toward late June or very early July: cherry tomatoes, basil, green beans, and bulbing onions. Starting a little after that, toward later July: main season tomatoes, corn, melons, and eggplant. All of these crops come on in many waves so they overlap and appear and reappear over the long season. Every year our plan is to grow each crop for the longest season it can be grown well in our area. We then have a diverse list of crops from which to harvest each week. Our CSA boxes are designed carefully each week, based on what we have, and on feedback from our surveys about what people want. Due to their popularity, certain veggies have come to be considered as staples and will be in the boxes very regularly. These staples include lettuce, carrots, bunched greens like kales and chard, broccoli, onions (or leeks, scallions, garlic), sweet corn, potatoes, zucchini, and of course ample tomatoes of all kinds! Other crops will rotate through either based on a shorter season (spinach and celery for example), or more limited popularity (eggplant and fennel for example). We grow many, many beautiful and delicious varieties of each vegetable so prepare yourselves for six months of feasting!

Your Farmer,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

REGULAR BOX:

  • Rainbow chard
  • Potatoes – Believe or not, these are from last fall’s harvest! They have kept very well in the cooler and we have been eating them all winter. Still had a bunch, they still taste great, and thought, why not?
  • Baby Bok Choy
  • Zucchini
  • Napa cabbage – Oh so big and lovely right now. Perfect for salad with creamy tangy dressings or easy to make your own kimchee (see recipe below).
  • Salad turnips – if you are new to Mountain Bounty, you are in for a treat with these. Try them raw in a dish of rice vinegar.
  • Lettuce
  • Scallions
  • Spinach
  • Beets
  • Dill

SMALL BOX:

  • Rainbow chard
  • Zucchini
  • Napa cabbage – Oh so big and lovely right now. Perfect for salad with creamy tangy dressings (and maybe the dill?) or easy to make your own kimchee (see recipe below).
  • Salad turnips – if you are new to Mountain Bounty, you are in for a treat with these. Try them raw in a dish of rice vinegar.
  • Lettuce
  • Scallions
  • Spinach
  • Dill

RECIPES

HOW TO MAKE EASY KIMCHEE
Makes 1 quart
INGREDIENTS

1 medium head (2 pounds) napa cabbage

1/4 cup sea salt or kosher salt (see Recipe Notes)

Water (see Recipe Notes)

1 tablespoon grated garlic (5 to 6 cloves)

1 teaspoon grated ginger

1 teaspoon sugar

2 to 3 tablespoons seafood flavor or water (optional, see Recipe Notes)

1 to 5 tablespoons Korean red pepper flakes (gochugaru)

8 ounces Korean radish or daikon, peeled and cut into matchsticks

4 scallions, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces

Equipment

Cutting board and knife

Large bowl

Gloves (optional but highly recommended)

Plate and something to weigh the kimchi down, like a jar or can of beans

Colander

Small bowl

Clean 1-quart jar with canning lid or plastic lid

Bowl or plate to place under jar during fermentation
INSTRUCTIONS
Slice the cabbage: Cut the cabbage lengthwise into quarters and remove the cores. Cut each quarter crosswise into 2-inch-wide strips.

Salt the cabbage: Place the cabbage and salt in a large bowl. Using your hands (gloves optional), massage the salt into the cabbage until it starts to soften a bit, then add water to cover the cabbage. Put a plate on top and weigh it down with something heavy, like a jar or can of beans. Let stand for 1 to 2 hours.

Rinse and drain the cabbage: Rinse the cabbage under cold water 3 times and drain in a colander for 15 to 20 minutes. Rinse and dry the bowl you used for salting, and set it aside to use in step 5.

Make the paste: Meanwhile, combine the garlic, ginger, sugar, and seafood flavor (or 3 tablespoons water) in a small bowl and mix to form a smooth paste. Mix in the gochugaru, using 1 tablespoon for mild and up to 5 tablespoons for spicy (I like about 3 1/2 tablespoons).

Combine the vegetables and paste: Gently squeeze any remaining water from the cabbage and return it to the bowl along with the radish, scallions, and seasoning paste.

Mix thoroughly: Using your hands, gently work the paste into the vegetables until they are thoroughly coated. The gloves are optional here but highly recommended to protect your hands from stings, stains, and smells!

Pack the kimchi into the jar: Pack the kimchi into the jar, pressing down on it until the brine rises to cover the vegetables. Leave at least 1 inch of headspace. Seal the jar with the lid.

Let it ferment: Let the jar stand at room temperature for 1 to 5 days. You may see bubbles inside the jar and brine may seep out of the lid; place a bowl or plate under the jar to help catch any overflow.

Check it daily and refrigerate when ready: Check the kimchi once a day, pressing down on the vegetables with a clean finger or spoon to keep them submerged under the brine. (This also releases gases produced during fermentation.) Taste a little at this point, too! When the kimchi tastes ripe enough for your liking, transfer the jar to the refrigerator. You may eat it right away, but it’s best after another week or two.

Recipe Notes

  • Salt: Use salt that is free of iodine and anti-caking agents, which can inhibit fermentation.
  • Water: Chlorinated water can inhibit fermentation, so use spring, distilled, or filtered water if you can.
  • Seafood flavor and vegetarian alternatives: Seafood gives kimchi an umami flavor. Different regions and families may use fish sauce, salted shrimp paste, oysters, and other seafood. Use about 2 tablespoons of fish sauce, salted shrimp paste, or a combination of the two. For vegetarian kimchi, I like using 3/4 teaspoon kelp powder mixed with 3 tablespoons water, or simply 3 tablespoons of water.

Broiled Zucchini with Yogurt-Dill Sauce

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup plain yogurt

2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh dill

1 small clove garlic, grated

1/2 teaspoon lemon juice

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

1-2 zucchini

1 tablespoon olive oil

INSTRUCTIONS:
Preheat broiler. If using the main compartment of the oven (as opposed to a separate broiler compartment below), place a rack about 5 inches from the broiler element.
In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt, dill, garlic, and lemon juice. If necessary, thin with water to a pourable consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.

Trim ends off zucchini. Cut in half crosswise, then lengthwise into 4-6 spears. Toss with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place zucchini in an oven-proof skillet or pan and broil, flipping occasionally, until slightly charred and tender but not mushy, about 10 minutes. Remove from broiler.
Serve zucchini warm or chilled with yogurt-dill sauce.

Sauteed Hakurai Turnips and Braised Greens

INGREDIENTS

1 bunch Hakurei turnips

1bunch leafy greens (such as chard, choi, or spinach)

2 teaspoons oil, divided

1/2 cup water, apple juice or white wine

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

DIRECTIONS
Cut the greens from the turnips. Wash and tear all the greens into large pieces and remove the stems. Cut the turnips into bite sized pieces. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Sautee the turnips stirring or tossing occasionally until they are crispy outside and tender inside. Season with salt and pepper and remove to a warm plate. In the same pan, heat the remaining oil over medium heat. Add the washed and wet greens, and add to pan in batches. Stir and mix as they wilt. Add the wine or other liquid and cook until it is mostly evaporated. Plate greens and arrange the warm turnips on top.

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LAST WEEK 24, Summer 2015

November 2, 2015

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

This Thursday is your LAST SUMMER VEGGIE BOX!
Next week starts our Winter deliveries. If you’re not already signed up and payments arranged, please call right away so you don’t miss out!
Dear Farm Members,

Very appropriately, we are entering our final week of the summer season with a good solid rain. Finally. Now we will be able to do a little more seeding of cover crops, and then finish a few cleanup chores. After the fields are put to rest, we will spend a solid week talking over how the season went and beginning to make plans for next year. Please help us to continue refining the farm by giving us your input: CLICK HERE FOR LINK TO SURVEY​Don’t forget to include your contact info at the end for a chance to win a free week of veggies!

Pulling off a farm season a Mountain Bounty is a big enough project that it can be hard for me to grasp. Getting to the end seems almost impossible. I have mixed feelings of relief, satisfaction, and a tinge of sadness. I look forward to a couple of slower (and non-dusty!) months coming up, and will also miss the bustle, excitement, and all the laughter of the busy season.

I would like to recognize, with gratitude, all the contributors who have made this season happen. First, you the farm members, through your belief in us and in making a direct connection to your food. Thank you so much for keeping the farm alive! And thanks to the farm crew: Missy, Cory, Abby, Rachel, Maia, Mike, Aaron, Jordan, Christina, Alex, Billy, Molly, Sonya, Erica, Catherine, Mielle, and Jason! These are the folks who continue to amaze, impress, teach, entertain, and throw their whole hearts into doing this work. I also want to thank my family for their unending love and support. Angie, the boys, and my folks help in so many ways.  Finally, a special thank you to Steve Beckwitt, who has hosted an important piece of the farm on his land for the past 18 years. His generosity and good humor are so appreciated.

As a final tidbit: Mike made this time lapse video last week of our early Thursday morning CSA box packing:​ https://youtu.be/8AxOGgp0xAo

Thanks, everyone, and we’ll see you next spring (if not next week with the first winter box, which will be coming from us)!

John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK
We have 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Due to the dynamic nature of farming, this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive:

REGULAR BOX:

  • Butternut squash
  • Carrots
  • Baby bok choy
  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio – This is the gorgeous Treviso type that’s been our favorite for the past few years, it looks kind of like a very red romaine lettuce or bok choy.
  • Kale
  • Mixed herb bundle
  • Onion
  • Radishes
  • Potatoes
  • Salad turnips
  • Beets

SMALL BOX:

  • Butternut squash
  • Carrots
  • Baby bok choy
  • Lettuce
  • Radicchio – This is the gorgeous Treviso type that’s been our favorite for the past few years, it looks kind of like a very red romaine lettuce or bok choy.
  • Kale
  • Mixed herb bundle
  • Onion
  • Radishes

​RECIPES

​Roasted Balsamic Radicchio
Such a delicious way to enjoy radicchio!

STIR-FRIED SESAME BABY BOK CHOY
Serve with Kung-Pao Chicken or Sweet and Sour Pork… yum!

SMOKY CHILI WITH BUTTERNUT SQUASH

I love this recipe from my cookbook, it’s so great for the wintertime and comes together quickly if you use canned beans. Makes 4 servings, and it’s kid-friendly if you don’t make it too spicy!

Preheat oven to 425˚. Combine in an oven-safe dish or pan:
1 small butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1”chunks
2 lbs roma tomatoes, cut into eighths
2-3 Tbl olive oil
¾ tsp salt
½ tsp cumin
Roast these for 45 minutes until soft, stirring once or twice. Set aside.
Combine in a large pot:
1 Tbl olive oil
1 yellow onion, diced
1-3 jalapenos, seeded & diced¼ tsp salt
Cook over medium-low heat about 10 minutes, until onions begin to color.
Add:

1 clove garlic, pressed or minced
Cook for about 3 more minutes, until garlic is fragrant.
Add the roasted squash and tomatoes, and:
2-4 chipotle peppers, seeds removed and diced
1 Tbl chili powder
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp dry oregano, rubbed between palms
½ tsp salt
Simmer for 10 minutes, then add:

2 cups cooked black beans
(canned ok)
Juice of 1 lime
Cooking water from beans, as needed; or broth, or water

. Adjust salt, lime, and chilis to taste.
Garnish with chopped cilantro, onions, cream, avocado chunks, etc.

​~​
Mountain Bounty Farm

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Week 23, Summer 2015

October 26, 2015
OUR LAST SUMMER VEGGIE BOX is next week! 
​Our first winter delivery is November​ 12​, make sure you’re on the list:
 or UPDATE YOUR WINTER SUBSCRIPTION​ (to add or cancel shares, or contribute to the community fund).

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,

I frequently get asked about my favorite vegetable. My usual response is to fudge and say something vague about how much I like all of them. The thing is, I do love them all. It’s kind of like asking me to choose my favorite child. But, recently, I have been heaping extra and unequal, love and affection on one of my babies: escarole. For the last couple weeks anyway, escarole is my favorite. To those of you who have been members for a while and may recall past rants about escarole and radicchio — sorry to keep doing this. It’s just so good in so many ways. And for those of you wondering what the heck escarole is, it’s the very large, lettuce looking thing in your box this week. It makes the best salads ever. Try it with a slightly sweet vinaigrette, roasted pecans, shavings of some good hard cheese, perhaps a few pear or apple or persimmon slices, and the last few super sweet little tomatoes of the season.

Also notable in your boxes this week are dry calypso beans. Dry beans are not what you would typically expect from a fresh vegetable CSA. We’ve been growing them for a few years in increasing amounts as a sort of “extreme weather insurance.” The drought, among other weather uncertainties, has encouraged us to be prepared for times when other crops may fail. What’s great about dry beans is that they use water in the early season when we have plenty, and are finished by the time that things get really dry and difficult. They also use relatively little water and create much of their own fertilizer. And best of all, they keep. So we are sharing some with you now, and keeping a supply in the barn for unknown challenges that may arise next season, for example if we have a super cold wet spring due to El Nino. Calypso beans also happen to be beautiful and excellent eating!

Happy Halloween,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK
We have 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Due to the dynamic nature of farming, this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive:

REGULAR BOX:

  • Pie pumpkin – use as a seasonal ornament – and then eat it! These guys are sweeter and less stringy than most pumpkins
  • Carrots
  • Arugula
  • Escarole – see note above
  • Dry Calypso beans – see note above
  • Potatoes
  • Green cabbage
  • Dill
  • Cauliflower – watch out for a few aphids hiding in there…
  • Tomatoes – last few of the season! We didn’t expect them to last this long but here they are.

SMALL BOX:

  • Pie pumpkins– use as a seasonal ornament – and then eat it! These guys are sweeter and less stringy than most pumpkins
  • Carrots
  • Escarole – see note above
  • Dry calypso beans – see note above
  • Potatoes
  • Purple cabbage
  • Dill
  • Cauliflower – watch out for a few aphids hiding in there…
  • Tomatoes — last few of the season! We didn’t expect them to last this long but here they are.

​RECIPES

Here’s ​a recipe similar to John’s suggestion above.​
You can also cook your escarole– this Italian recipe looks great and you can use the fennel from last week’s box if you still have it in the crisper.
​Roasting cauliflower florets in a hot oven concentrates their natural sweetness, turning them into something akin to vegetable candy.
Use whatever roots you like: carrots & potatoes from this week’s box… turnips & parsnips another time.
​~​
Mountain Bounty Farm
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Week 22 Summer 2015

October 19, 2015
Our last Summer Veggie delivery is the first week of November… make sure you’re signed up for the Winter Veggies from Riverdog Farm & Sunset Ridge’s citrus Fruit Shares (lots of mandarins & citrus but also kiwis, pomegranates, apples, and other winter fruits), starting the second week of November.
signup button green

Farm News, Box Contents, Recipes

Dear Farm Members,
Fall cleanup is well underway here on the farm and has now been augmented by that nice little rain we got this weekend. Garlic has been planted. Most of the fields have been seeded to cover crops, except in the relatively small areas that we are still harvesting. This is one of the more pleasurable seasons for us. The days are cooling (finally!) and the work begins to diminish. I like to reflect on the amazing quantity, quality, and variety of food that we have seeded, tended, and picked throughout the summer. Despite the drought, somehow it’s been another great year! Week after week, the boxes have been beautiful. This is week 22 of 24, so please don’t forget to come pickup your last couple boxes, they will be full of goodies!

Thanks,
John Tecklin

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

We have 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Due to the dynamic nature of farming, this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive:


REGULAR BOX:

  • Spaghetti squash
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Collard greens
  • Radishes
  • Cilantro
  • Lettuce
  • Roasting turnips – NOTE: these are very different from the smaller white salad turnips that we normally grow. They are stronger flavored and meant to be cooked.
  • Broccoli
  • Tomatoes

SMALL BOX:

  • Winter squash
  • Carrots
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Radishes
  • Cilantro
  • Tatsoi – this is the dark green, almost bok choy -looking green. Use like bok choy​ or spinach​, it is very tender and is easily overcooked.
  • Lettuce

RECIPES

Baby Greens With Balsamic-Roasted Turnips and Walnuts Use your lettuce in place of the baby greens, or lightly sauté your collard greens for a warm salad. Small box members, this recipe would be great with the tatsoi and any of your veggies good for roasting: radishes, carrots, winter squash, sweet potatoes.

Baked Leek and Sweet Potato Gratin ​Gratins are great meals for the fall and winter veggies. Use any thinly sliced root ​veggies or winter squash. You can tuck lightly steamed greens into a gratin as well, for a one-pot meal.

~​
Mountain Bounty Farm
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Week 21 Summer 2015

October 12, 2015
Our last Summer Veggie delivery is the first week of November… make sure you’re signed up for the Winter Veggies & Citrus Fruit shares (lots of mandarins but also kiwis, pomegranates, apples, and other winter fruits), starting the following week. signup button green

Farm Photos, Box Contents, Recipes

This block of our fields is so beautiful this time of year, full of luscious fall greens! Pictured are red beets, arugula, scallions, collards, kale and fennel:
Farmer Rachel harvesting some great looking heads from the broccoli patch:
Farmer Maia with an extra-large sweet potato:
We’re starting to pull some nice big heads of green cabbage out of the field:

IN YOUR VEGGIE BOXES THIS WEEK

We have 2 sizes of veggie boxes, so always check that you are picking up the correct size. Both are brown but smaller boxes are narrower and have a sticker that says “SMALL BOX” on them. Regular boxes have a MBF logo sticker. Due to the dynamic nature of farming, this list may be slightly different from what you actually receive​:

REGULAR​ VEGGIE​ BOX:

  • Acorn ​Squash​
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • White Onion
  • Potatoes
  • Beets
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Spinach
  • Arugula
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce

SMALL ​VEGGIE ​BOX:

  • Acorn ​Squash​
  • Carrots
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Arugula
  • Potatoes
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • White onion

RECIPES

Fall brings the lovely warm winter squashes… this week you get to try Acorn, a beautiful squash that will look pretty as a seasonal centerpiece until you cook it for dinner. Its thick outer skin may be somewhat intimidating, but this little gourd is an unsung hero of the squash world. It can be baked, sautéed, steamed, and pureed into delectable fall dishes like soup, or stuffed with a savory filling and used as a bowl itself, too. Try these recipes to get to know Acorn:
Use your white onion in place of the leeks, and feel free to add spinach too.
This is nice for a chilly-morning breakfast treat, too.
I love fall salads with beets and spicy arugula, and maple-balsamic is an incredible combination with these robust flavors. You can skip the bourbon candied pecans, but they’re really good.
This is a great way to prepare a simple, tender side dish of hearty greens, so delicious and good for you. The maple-balsamic vinaigrette above is also great with a raw massaged kale salad.
​~​
Mountain Bounty Farm
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